Calvin Harris and Rag’n Bone Man Inspire with ‘GIANT’

Kicking off the beginning of a playlist designed to fill the mind with the energy to conquer any dream, battle or goal. ‘GIANT’ by Calvin Harris and Rag’n Bone Man is the epitome of what it feels like to WIN. With a career that spans over 10 years, Scottish DJ Calvin Harris has brought the world of music hits such as ‘How Deep is Your Love’, ‘I Found You’ and ‘Promises’. His unique style of genre blending, emotionally charged vocals resonate in your mind while telling a simple message we can all relate to. This collaboration with Rag’n Bone Man is no exception as ‘Giant’ comes in at Calvin’s 40th Top 40 UK Production for the 35-year-old Producer.

Rag’n Bone Man, known as Rory Graham by his mates in the small town of Uckfield, began his roots as a Blues and R&B singer before transitioning his way to the world of HIP HOP. Debuting with his solo EP ‘Bluestown’ in 2012, Rag’n Bone Man has become a remix favorite among producers and began to rack up collaborations with artists around the globe, including Logic on their single ‘Broken People’ for the ‘Bright the Album Soundtrack’.

LYRIC HIGHLIGHTS

You taught me something, yeah
Freedom is ours
It was you who taught me living is
Togetherness, togetherness, togetherness

GIANT begins with Rag’n Bone’s almost gospel-like vocals behind a powerful combination of guitar and piano that resembles a chamber organ. Combine those elements with a chorus that features Calvin’s signature production style, soft horns, and choir hooks. The primary message of the song unveils a man who strengthens himself to lift up his partner or friend and carry the weight of the world on his shoulders, as only a giant can do.

Original Article courtesy of Musicto.com  – Discover some of the best playlists around the world at Music To

FENNI CASINO & DJ PAIN 1’S PRE-RELEASE “FOCUSED”

“Focused” is a song so recently released by Atlanta artist Fenni Casino, it hasn’t even been uploaded to streaming platforms yet, much less officially distributed. So, if you’re looking for it online, it will probably be a while before you find it. There are a range of similar sounding, equal quality songs already uploaded to Fenni’s Soundcloud, but this single, featuring Mack Gram and set to a beat produced by Hip Hop legend DJ Pain 1 might be better sounding on paper than it is in reality. It’s the kind of song you want playing in the background while you read, study, or go for a long drive at night; but, at it’s essence, this song is not one that I can imagine anybody focusing on. It’s not bad by any means. It’s got a lot of well-written lyrics which is an element of the song making process that I prize above all else. When an artist shows some attention to lyricism, for me, it stands as credit to their caliber as an artist and to their esteem as a worthy participant in the collaborative act of making songs which all add up to continue defining and re-defining this ever-evolving genre. But even with a moderate amount of thought placed on the lyrical end of things, I still can’t find much ground to stand behind this track. It’s good, but just good. The whole song ends up being something a little too jazzy, too soul-infused, and too low key sounding to do anything with other than have playing in the background; this is music you can talk over. Casino’s style mirrors that of the circa 1990’s storyteller/confessional style rappers, which in today’s terminology would be equatable to something like a conscious rapper. Sounding a lot like Nas, especially during his Illmatic era, there should be a lot to love here — especially for someone who is such a fan of that era. There’s a few other noteworthy comparisons that this song brings to mind. Souls of Mischief (think their song “93 ’Til Infinity”), as well as Gravediggaz (think “1-800-Suicide”) and a little bit of anything by Mobb Deep. They’re all, like Casino, deeply conversational in flow and cadence, profoundly dated to the 90’s era of Hip Hop, with very similar stylistic choices occurring instrumentally as well. “Focused” is a song so recently released by Atlanta artist Fenni Casino, it hasn’t even been uploaded to streaming platforms yet, much less officially distributed. So, if you’re looking for it online, it will probably be a while before you find it. There are a range of similar sounding, equal quality songs already uploaded to Fenni’s Soundcloud, but this single, featuring Mack Gram and set to a beat produced by Hip Hop legend DJ Pain 1 might be better sounding on paper than it is in reality. It’s the kind of song you want playing in the background while you read, study, or go for a long drive at night; but, at it’s essence, this song is not one that I can imagine anybody focusing on. It’s not bad by any means. It’s got a lot of well-written lyrics which is an element of the song making process that I prize above all else. When an artist shows some attention to lyricism, for me, it stands as credit to their caliber as an artist and to their esteem as a worthy participant in the collaborative act of making songs which all add up to continue defining and re-defining this ever-evolving genre. But even with a moderate amount of thought placed on the lyrical end of things, I still can’t find much ground to stand behind this track. It’s good, but just good. The whole song ends up being something a little too jazzy, too soul-infused, and too low key sounding to do anything with other than have playing in the background; this is music you can talk over.

TO READ MORE ABOUT FENNI CASINO VISIT THE DEPOSIT BLOG: HERE

HIGH ROLLAZ STILL PUTS HIS MONEY ON THE DIRTY SOUTH

“High Roller” is a true-to-form Dirty South style anthem, with a southern twang on the vocals giving it that signature grit. High Rollaz, the principal artist on the track, has done some notable work lately, including a 2019 feature with the infallible KXNG Crooked, on a song called “Circle of Bosses.” Big Tuck, the feature on this track, has plenty of impressive collaborations to speak of, including ones with Chamillionaire — often credited for popularizing Dirty South with his song, “Ridin.” In 2006 alone, Big Tuck also worked with Bun B, Erykah Badu, and Paul Wall just to name a few. Dirty South is a sub-genre within Hip Hop, which, has not proven to be able to stand the test of time — unlike it’s still popular cousin, the Atlanta Trap sub-genre. Still, being nothing if not a purist, I commend them on their steadfast attempt to stay true to the time-held specifics of their stylistic sub category. Sounding new in its masterful production, but old in every other way, this song plays like the best possible version of an otherwise outmoded period in Hip Hop. In the vocal stylings of these two artists, you’ll hear a little Big K.R.I.T. (Especially in vocal intonation; think, “Confetti” from K.R.I.T.’s 2017 project), a little Jeezy (though Jeezy sounds a little more Atlanta influenced, to me, in terms of Southern classifications), and of course, Chamillionaire. No one can ever hear a Dirty South song without hearing Chamillionaire, and the fact that he did this style such original justice, may explain why so many after him have all fallen a little flat with their subsequent releases. “High Roller” is a true-to-form Dirty South style anthem, with a southern twang on the vocals giving it that signature grit. High Rollaz, the principal artist on the track, has done some notable work lately, including a 2019 feature with the infallible KXNG Crooked, on a song called “Circle of Bosses.” Big Tuck, the feature on this track, has plenty of impressive collaborations to speak of, including ones with Chamillionaire — often credited for popularizing Dirty South with his song, “Ridin.” In 2006 alone, Big Tuck also worked with Bun B, Erykah Badu, and Paul Wall just to name a few. Dirty South is a sub-genre within Hip Hop, which, has not proven to be able to stand the test of time — unlike it’s still popular cousin, the Atlanta Trap sub-genre. Still, being nothing if not a purist, I commend them on their steadfast attempt to stay true to the time-held specifics of their stylistic sub category. Sounding new in its masterful production, but old in every other way, this song plays like the best possible version of an otherwise outmoded period in Hip Hop.

TO READ MORE ABOUT HIGH ROLLAZ AND BIG TUCK VISIT THE DEPOSIT BLOG: HERE

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